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Pushing the envelope with leather, wood and stone: 'Qualities of Material' from Fort Standard

Pushing the envelope with leather, wood and stone: 'Qualities of Material' from Fort Standard

Leather isn't a structural element in furniture.

Unless, you are New York-based contemporary design studio Fort Standard.

The Stacked Leather Chair from duo Gregory Buntain and Ian Collings, of Fort Standard, is part of a furniture collection called the 'Qualities of Material' that debuted last month. 'Qualities of Material' explores and highlights the structural abilities and workability of materials like stone, leather, and wood. Through this collection, Fort Standard continues to pair timeless materials with modern process

 The  Stacked Leather Chair , from 'Qualities of Material' by Fort Standard

The Stacked Leather Chair, from 'Qualities of Material' by Fort Standard

Before seeing the Stacked Leather Chair, it would have been hard for me imagine leather in a role beyond a 'finish' for an existing frame of furniture. And yet, today it is the sole material used to craft the seat, legs, and arms of this occasional chair.

Another way that Fort Standard redefines material roles in this collection is through the detailing of the Relief Stone Cabinet.

 The  Relief Stone Cabinet , from 'Qualities of Material' by Fort Standard

The Relief Stone Cabinet, from 'Qualities of Material' by Fort Standard

The cabinet is built with beautiful, bluish-grey Soapstone. The relief on its facade is a result of stone being milled away, removing the excess weight from the panels and leaving behind only 'spines' that are needed for the structural support of the cabinet. In addition to the 'spines', we see that even the hinges and joints of panels are formed with the same material–Soapstone. This holistic way of using a single material, fluidly, and minimally, is incredibly appealing.

 The  Assemblage Wood Dining Table and Bench , from 'Qualities of Material' by Fort Standard

The Assemblage Wood Dining Table and Bench, from 'Qualities of Material' by Fort Standard

The third material in this collection is wood, and here Fort Standard shows us the 'power of many'. Hundreds of slim chips of Maple wood, come together to create a grid of triangular tubes, which in turn, form the base and legs for the Assemblage Wood Tables and Benches. The combined strength of these smaller components is immense, and the benches and tables can withstand massive weights.

Kudos to Fort Standard for continuing to redefine the role of materials and pushing the boundaries of what natural materials can do!

 The 'Qualities of Material' collection by Fort Standard

The 'Qualities of Material' collection by Fort Standard

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